Roles of the Care Team

Surgeon icon

Surgeon

Your surgeon will be with you beyond the initial evaluation and surgery, so it is important to build a two-way relationship that will let you communicate throughout the process. Your surgeon will help you create a recovery plan and will see you at certain times along the way, to ensure your treatment is progressing as intended.

Family and Friends icon

Family and Friends

You will need help at home along the way. Involve your family or close friends from the start, so that they can understand the procedure as well as you do. Your family and close friends may be able to help you plan for surgery and recover from it; for example, they may help you with physical therapy exercises.

Patient icon

Patient

You are the most important member of the care team, and will need to be active in the process both before and after surgery to help your limb heal. Tasks will include adjusting the external fixator, caring for the pin sites, performing physical therapy exercises, and others as instructed by your surgeon and other members of the care team. You should also ask questions of your surgeon and other medical professionals, to ensure you fully understand each step of the way — and to help your care team meet your needs. Share your concerns, so that your surgeon, nurses and physical therapist can make your recovery as smooth as possible.

Hospital Team icon

Hospital Team

Nurses and other medical professionals in the hospital will assess your health status before surgery. They will coordinate your hospital stay on the day of surgery and after surgery, and be there to guide you through each phase of your treatment, until you are able to go home. The nursing staff will help control your pain and teach you about caring for yourself after surgery. Don’t be afraid to ask your nurses questions about the surgery process, or to express your concerns before or after surgery — nurses can help you with and advise you on a range of issues.

Physical Therapist icon

Physical Therapist

Your physical therapist will assess your movement ability before surgery and work with you throughout the process to help you stay as active and independent as possible. After surgery, the physical therapist will teach you exercises to do both in the hospital and at home, and give you a plan for getting you back on your feet. You may see the physical therapist on a regular basis, to see how you are progressing and to make any changes to the plan.

Surgeon

Your surgeon will be with you beyond the initial evaluation and surgery, so it is important to build a two-way relationship that will let you communicate throughout the process. Your surgeon will help you create a recovery plan and will see you at certain times along the way, to ensure your treatment is progressing as intended.

Family and Friends

You will need help at home along the way. Involve your family or close friends from the start, so that they can understand the procedure as well as you do. Your family and close friends may be able to help you plan for surgery and recover from it; for example, they may help you with physical therapy exercises.

Patient

You are the most important member of the care team, and will need to be active in the process both before and after surgery to help your limb heal. Tasks will include adjusting the external fixator, caring for the pin sites, performing physical therapy exercises, and others as instructed by your surgeon and other members of the care team. You should also ask questions of your surgeon and other medical professionals, to ensure you fully understand each step of the way — and to help your care team meet your needs. Share your concerns, so that your surgeon, nurses and physical therapist can make your recovery as smooth as possible.

Hospital Team

Nurses and other medical professionals in the hospital will assess your health status before surgery. They will coordinate your hospital stay on the day of surgery and after surgery, and be there to guide you through each phase of your treatment, until you are able to go home. The nursing staff will help control your pain and teach you about caring for yourself after surgery. Don’t be afraid to ask your nurses questions about the surgery process, or to express your concerns before or after surgery — nurses can help you with and advise you on a range of issues.

Physical Therapist

Your physical therapist will assess your movement ability before surgery and work with you throughout the process to help you stay as active and independent as possible. After surgery, the physical therapist will teach you exercises to do both in the hospital and at home, and give you a plan for getting you back on your feet. You may see the physical therapist on a regular basis, to see how you are progressing and to make any changes to the plan.